Human brain conserved in formaldehyde in a museum

Museum Tours and Rare Diseases?

Located in Kensington, New South Wales, the heart of Sydney, is the Museum of Human Disease.

You can find over 2,700 specimens of disease filled human tissue.

What to Know When Visiting

If you’re planning a visit to witness firsthand all of the interesting pathology that’s been studied, get excited for the low cost of touring. You’ll find that it’s only a $10 charge per adult to go through the museum and enjoy the historical platform. Teachers, UNSW staff and students get in for free, and holiday and event programs run year round. Being the only publicly accessible medical pathology collection, you’re certain to learn a thing or two.  

The museum originally opened in the 1960s to provide education to the public, regarding the importance of managing your health and lifestyle choices. Viewing displays, you’ll find diseases that no longer exist, are rare and reflect changes in our society in the present-day, as well as potential future threats when visiting. Learning about all of the diseases we have faced and are facing, gives you the upper hand at knowing your enemies. 

Rare Findings at The Museum of Human Disease

You may find specimens obtained via autopsy or a surgical removal while walking around. Each display offers information on abnormalities, history and clinical descriptions that are available. From inflammation of a gallbladder to brain tumors, heart attacks and close-ups of chronic ulcers – there are plenty of organs on display to showcase the impact we have on our bodies as well as diseases. Learn about unique diseases from around the world and what we’ve accomplished in curing them.

Before planning your visit, check out the interactive images offered by the museum online. 

You may want to leave the cameras and snacks at home though, as they are not permitted inside the museum. You can choose to settle for concessions close by, or branch out to various restaurants in the city to enjoy after finishing your tour and learning all of the amazing ways the pathology field progresses daily. 

Sources: 

Interactive Images and history – http://web.med.unsw.edu.au/pathmus/default.htm

Pricing, general rules, and booking – https://www.diseasemuseum.med.unsw.edu.au/visiting